Sciences

 

Science Department Home Page

315 General Science/Physical Science
Credit: 0.5
An introductory class geared specifically to the ninth grade. Students will challenge
their skills to master scientific information and prepare for success in lab science courses. Research terminology, methods, process thinking and preparation of lab reports round out the expectations of this class.

323 Honors Biology
Credit: 1 (weighted)
This course is designed to provide a solid academic foundation in the life sciences.
Students will develop a conceptual framework of biology through a balanced mixture of
lecture materials and lab exercises. Comprehensive practice and assessment of
science skills, with an emphasis on process, inquiry and reasoning will be provided.
Topics covered correlate to the National Science Education Standards and include cell
biology and metabolism, energetics, genetics, molecular biology, evolution, taxonomy,
domain classification, kingdom characteristics and survey, and ecology. Higher order
thinking and enrichment of concepts will enhance each topic covered.

325 Biology
Credit: 1
This course is designed to provide a solid academic foundation in the life sciences. A
balanced mixture of lecture materials and lab exercises will demonstrate basic biological
concepts. Observation and reasoning skills will be taught.

333 Honors Chemistry
Credit: 1 (weighted)
This course emphasizes the science of Chemistry as part of our every life day and
everything around us. This course is designed for the student who can apply strong
math (algebra) and previous science concepts in the studying of chemistry as the
science of matter, structure, and changes that occur with respect to energy. In studying
chemistry as the cornerstone of the sciences, emphasis is placed on an in-depth
comprehension of traditional chemical concepts and theories by engaging students in
scientific inquiry. In preparation for challenges in scientific research, the course further
introduces the development of problem solving and critical thinking skills. Lectures will
include the practical applications of the chemical principles to real problems of chemists
and engineers. The basic chemical principles will be further examined experimentally
with both qualitative and quantitative laboratory skills. A science research and
development project is also required.

335 Chemistry
Credit: 1
Students taking chemistry should have encountered some basic chemical skills in their
biology course. The purpose of this course is to give the student a more in-depth look at
the theory underlying chemical principles. The student will also apply this knowledge to
promote logical thinking and problem solving ability, with specified lab experiments to
further enhance the knowledge and application of these principles.

337 Conceptual Chemistry
Credit: 1
Same material as 3303 with an emphasis less on mathematical computation for
problem solving and more on visual conceptualization to analyze issues studied.

343 Honors Physics
Credit: 1 (weighted)
This course uses algebra and trigonometry based mathematical models along with an
introduction to calculus methods to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe
the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear
kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic
motion, electrostatic forces, electric fields electric potentials, direct current circuits, magneto-static forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating current
circuits, and light. Students who wish to pursue and engineering/scientific course of
study at the university level should consider enrolling for this course. Upon completion,
students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and
display analytical problem solving ability for the topics covered. A laboratory experience
is provided in which the emphasis is placed on laboratory experiments that enhance
materials presented in the classroom.

345 Physics
Credit: 1
This course deals with the logical development of the basic principles of physics with
the emphasis on mastering the fundamental concepts through specified laboratory work
and problem solving.

347 Conceptual Physics
Credit: 1
Same material as 345 with an emphasis less on mathematical computation, but more
on visual and conceptual solving methods to deal with issues studied.

 

Electives

 

351 AP Biology
Credit: 1 (weighted)
This course will enhance the student’s knowledge of general biology. The course is in
the format of a first year college level biology class for the biology/premed major. Topics
covered include cell biology and metabolism, energetics, genetics, molecular biology,
evolution, ecology, taxonomy, domain classification and characteristics, and human
biology. The course covers both lecture and laboratory format including independent
research. Special emphasis is placed on preparation for a comprehensive exam to be
taken in May.

361 Honors Biology II
Credit: 0.5 (weighted)
This course will enhance the student’s knowledge of general biology. The course is in the format of a first year college level biology class for the biology/premed major. Topics covered include cell biology and metabolism, energetics, genetics, molecular biology, evolution, ecology, taxonomy, domain classification and characteristics, and human biology. The course covers both lecture and laboratory format including independent research.

353 AP Chemistry
Credit: 1 (weighted)
This course’s lecture topics and labs are based on a first year college level chemistry
course for chemists or engineers. It is a deeper exploration of general chemistry topics
and also has greater emphasis on the mathematics of chemical problem solving and
descriptive chemistry. Topics address preparation for the AP exam and include
atom/molecular structure, bonding, reactions, stoichiometry, energy principles, gas
laws, acids/bases, equilibrium, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic
chemistry and biochemistry. Laboratory experiences are designed to prepare for the
laboratory portion of the AP exam.

363 Honors Chemistry II
Credit: 0.5 (weighted)
This course is for students interested in additional chemistry. Students will use honors
texts (college listed) for a more in-depth study of some topics introduced in Chemistry
I/Honors Chemistry I and for the study of new topics that had not been covered.
Concepts for consideration include: oxidation-reduction, eletrochemistry,
thermochemistry, solutions, introductory organic chemistry, polymers, and nuclear
chemistry. Laboratory investigation will supplement lecture topics.

367 Sports Medicine
Credit: 0.5
The course focuses on three critical areas of sports medicine. Students will learn how
athletic health care is safely organized and implemented. Students will gain an
understanding of the injury process: from prevention, assessment, First Aid, treatment
and rehabilitation of sports-related injuries. Students will also receive an introduction to
sports anatomy and physiology as well as basic nutrition. As a component of the class,
students will learn to perform the duties of a student trainer and will be assigned to
provide coverage to one of the school’s sports teams. The textbook used meets the
requirements of the National Athletic Trainer Association.

369 Anatomy and Physiology
Credit: 0.5
Human Anatomy and Physiology will involve the study of the form and function of the
major body systems, and the cells and tissues of which they are composed. The
principal level of focus as at the level of organs, systems, body organization, and how
the integration of body system function is vital to homeostasis.

371 Environmental Science
Credit: 0.5
This course Meets 2 days a week: Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary science involved in understanding and managing the natural environment. It involves study of the interrelationships of the physical and chemical components of the natural world, and the analysis of natural and man-made environmental problems. Components of study include aspects of atmospheric science, ecology, environmental chemistry, and the geosciences.

373 Forensic Science
Credit: 0.5
Upon successful completion of Chemistry, students are eligible for Forensic Science.
This lab-based elective meets twice a week in the first semester and three times per week
in the second semester.  It gives students the opportunity to integrate their knowledge of
chemistry, physics and biology, while improving problem solving abilities in a crime lab
context.  Students will learn how evidence is gathered and analyzed, along with its relative
value in criminal justice.  Students will evaluate case studies, conduct forensic lab exercise
with different types of evidence.  The course will culminate the use of all their course
knowledge with the processing of a mock crime scene.  Students will have opportunities
to apply scientific methodology, inductive and deductive logic, ethics, and
probability/uncertainty to their forensic problems. Students gain the practical knowledge
to be discerning citizens ready for competent jury service or community leadership.

377 Astronomy
Credit: 0.5
What makes a star shine? For how long will the Sun keep shining? What are black holes and how can they form? General introduction to the part of contemporary astronomy that includes how stars form and how they end their existence, will provide answers to these questions and more. The course gives special attention to the exciting discoveries of the past few years. Topics include modern astronomical instruments such as the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Kepler mission to discover extrasolar planets, the new generation of 8- and 10-meter mountaintop telescopes, results from them, and their even-larger planned successors of 30-meter-diameter equivalents; how astronomers interpret the light received from distant celestial objects; the Sun as a typical star (and how its future will affect ours); and our modern understanding of how stars work and how they change with time. We will also discuss how pulsars and black holes result from the evolution of normal, massive stars and how supermassive black holes lurk at the center of galaxies and quasars. We will discuss the discovery of planets around stars other than the Sun. We regularly discuss the latest news briefs and developments in astronomy and relate them to the topics covered in the course.